Dyne

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Dynes redirects here. For the president of the University of California system, see Robert C. Dynes.

In physics, the dyne (symbol "dyn", from Greek δύναμις (dynamis) meaning power, force) is a unit of force specified in the centimetre-gram-second (CGS) system of units, a predecessor of the modern SI. One dyne is equal to exactly 10 micronewtons. Further, the dyne can be defined as "the force required to accelerate a mass of one gram at a rate of one centimetre per second squared".

Dynes per centimetre is the measurement usually associated with measuring surface tension. For example, the surface tension of distilled water is 72 dyn/cm at 25 °C (77 °F).

Units of force
newton
(SI unit)
dyne kilogram-force,
kilopond
pound-force poundal
1 N ≡ 1 kg·m/s² = 105 dyn ≈ 0.10197 kp ≈ 0.22481 lbf ≈ 7.2330 pdl
1 dyn = 10−5 N ≡ 1 g·cm/s² ≈ 1.0197×10−6 kp ≈ 2.2481×10−6 lbf ≈ 7.2330×10−5 pdl
1 kp = 9.80665 N = 980665 dyn gn·(1 kg) ≈ 2.2046 lbf ≈ 70.932 pdl
1 lbf ≈ 4.448222 N ≈ 444822 dyn ≈ 0.45359 kp gn·(1 lb) ≈ 32.174 pdl
1 pdl ≈ 0.138255 N ≈ 13825 dyn ≈ 0.014098 kp ≈ 0.031081 lbf ≡ 1 lb·ft/s²
The value of gn as used in the official definition of the kilogram-force is used here for all gravitational units.
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ast:Dina de:Dyn eo:Dino eu:Dina ko:다인 it:Dyne he:דיין (מידה) nl:Dyne sl:Dina fi:Dyne uk:Дина



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