Drug allergy physical examination

Jump to: navigation, search

Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1] Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Charmaine Patel, M.D. [2]

Drug Allergy

Home

Patient Information

Overview

Classification

Pathophysiology

Causes

Differentiating Drug allergy from other Diseases

Epidemiology and Demographics

Risk Factors

Screening

Natural History, Complications and Prognosis

Diagnosis

History and Symptoms

Physical Examination

Laboratory Findings

Other Diagnostic Studies

Treatment

Medical Therapy

Primary Prevention

Secondary Prevention

Cost-Effectiveness of Therapy

Future or Investigational Therapies

Case Studies

Case #1

Drug allergy physical examination On the Web

Most recent articles

Most cited articles

Review articles

CME Programs

Powerpoint slides

Images

American Roentgen Ray Society Images of Drug allergy physical examination

All Images
X-rays
Echo & Ultrasound
CT Images
MRI

Ongoing Trials at Clinical Trials.gov

US National Guidelines Clearinghouse

NICE Guidance

FDA on Drug allergy physical examination

CDC on Drug allergy physical examination

Drug allergy physical examination in the news

Blogs on Drug allergy physical examination

Directions to Hospitals Treating Drug allergy

Risk calculators and risk factors for Drug allergy physical examination

Overview

Findings on physical examination will vary widely in drug allergy, depending on the specific manifestation of the type of drug allergy (Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis), and the severity of the allergic reaction. A full, comprehensive physical examination should be performed to distinguish drug allergy from any other causes and conditions, and particular attention should be given to the respiratory and cardiovascular systems to quickly recognize impending life-threatening reactions.

Physical Examination

Appearance of the Patient

This will vary depending on the severity of the reaction. Patient may be uncomfortable, itchy, or may just have a very localized area of redness. They may have a rash or lesions that are visible on first glance, and if they are experiencing bronchospasm or angioedema, they may be visibly short of breath. They may also appear fatigued, with redness of the skin and eyes.

Vitals

Temperature

Pulse

Rate
  • Tachycardia may be present in cases that develop into anaphylactic shock.
Rhythm
  • The pulse is regular
Strength
  • The pulse may be weak

Blood Pressure

  • Hypotension may be present in cases leading to anaphylactic shock

Respiratory Rate

Skin

Head

Eyes

Throat

Neck

References



Linked-in.jpg