Coronary heart disease secondary prevention smoking cessation

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]

2011 AHA/ACCF Guidelines for Secondary Prevention and Risk Reduction Therapy for Patients with Coronary and other Atherosclerotic Vascular Disease (DO NOT EDIT) [1]

Smoking Cessation (DO NOT EDIT) [1]

Goal: Complete cessation. No exposure to environmental tobacco smoke.
Class I
"1. Patients should be asked about tobacco use status at every office visit. [2][3][4][5][6] (Level of Evidence: B) "
"2. Every tobacco user should be advised at every visit to quit. [4][5][6][7] (Level of Evidence: A) "
"3. The tobacco user's willingness to quit should be assessed at every visit. (Level of Evidence: C) "
"4. Patients should be assisted by counseling and by development of a plan for quitting that may include pharmacotherapy and/or referral to a smoking cessation program. [4][5][8][6][9][7] (Level of Evidence: A) "
"5. Arrangement for follow up is recommended. (Level of Evidence: C) "
"6. All patients should be advised at every office visit to avoid exposure to environmental tobacco smoke at work, home, and public places. [10][11] (Level of Evidence: B) "

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Smith SC, Benjamin EJ, Bonow RO, Braun LT, Creager MA, Franklin BA; et al. (2011). "AHA/ACCF Secondary Prevention and Risk Reduction Therapy for Patients with Coronary and other Atherosclerotic Vascular Disease: 2011 update: a guideline from the American Heart Association and American College of Cardiology Foundation". Circulation. 124 (22): 2458–73. doi:10.1161/CIR.0b013e318235eb4d. PMID 22052934.
  2. Rothemich SF, Woolf SH, Johnson RE; et al. (2008). "Effect on cessation counseling of documenting smoking status as a routine vital sign: an ACORN study". Ann Fam Med. 6 (1): 60–8. doi:10.1370/afm.750. PMC 2203392. PMID 18195316.
  3. Rosser W, McDowell I, Newell C (1992). "Documenting smoking Status: Trial of three strategies". Can Fam Physician. 38: 1623–8. PMC 2146014. PMID 21221363. Unknown parameter |month= ignored (help)
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 "Systems Change: Treating Tobacco Use and Dependence".
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 Cummings SR, Coates TJ, Richard RJ; et al. (1989). "Training physicians in counseling about smoking cessation. A randomized trial of the "Quit for Life" program". Ann. Intern. Med. 110 (8): 640–7. PMID 2930094. Unknown parameter |month= ignored (help)
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 "www.surgeongeneral.gov".
  7. 7.0 7.1 Anthonisen NR, Skeans MA, Wise RA, Manfreda J, Kanner RE, Connett JE (2005). "The effects of a smoking cessation intervention on 14.5-year mortality: a randomized clinical trial". Ann. Intern. Med. 142 (4): 233–9. PMID 15710956. Unknown parameter |month= ignored (help)
  8. Cummings SR, Richard RJ, Duncan CL; et al. (1989). "Training physicians about smoking cessation: a controlled trial in private practice". J Gen Intern Med. 4 (6): 482–9. PMID 2685206.
  9. Duncan C, Stein MJ, Cummings SR (1991). "Staff involvement and special follow-up time increase physicians' counseling about smoking cessation: a controlled trial". Am J Public Health. 81 (7): 899–901. PMC 1405179. PMID 2053669. Unknown parameter |month= ignored (help)
  10. The health consequences of involuntary exposure to tobacco smoke: a report of the Surgeon General. Rockville, MD: U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Office of the Surgeon General. 2006. ISBN 0-16-076152-2.
  11. Institute of Medicine; Committee on Secondhand Smoke Exposure and Acute Coronary Events (2010). Secondhand Smoke Exposure and Cardiovascular Effects: Making Sense of the Evidence. Washington, D.C: National Academies Press. ISBN 0-309-13839-6.

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