Constrictive pericarditis surgery

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1] Associate Editor in Chief: M.Umer Tariq [2]

Overview

Pericardiectomy is the only definitive management of chronic constrictive pericarditis. Effort should be made to remove as much of the pericardium as possible. Extensive penetration of the myocardium by fibrosis and calcification is associated with poor outcome. Operative mortality ranges from 55% to 10%.

Surgery

Pericardiectomy is the only definitive management of chronic constrictive pericarditis. Effort should be made to remove as much of the pericardium as possible. Extensive penetration of the myocardium by fibrosis and calcification is associated with poor outcome. Operative mortality ranges from 55% to 10%[1]


2015 ESC Guidelines for the management of pericardial diseases: (DO NOT EDIT) [2]

Recommendations for therapy of constrictive pericarditis:

Class I
"1. The mainstay of treatment of chronic permanent constriction is pericardiectomy" "1. (Level of Evidence: C)"


To review the full guidelines for the management of constrictive percarditis, click here.

Sources

  • 2015 ESC Guidelines for the diagnosis and management of pericardial diseases: The Task Force for the Diagnosis and Management of Pericardial Diseases of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Endorsed by: The European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery (EACTS)[2]


References

  1. Depboylu BC, Mootoosamy P, Vistarini N, Testuz A, El-Hamamsy I, Cikirikcioglu M (2017). "Surgical Treatment of Constrictive Pericarditis". Tex Heart Inst J. 44 (2): 101–106. doi:10.14503/THIJ-16-5772. PMC 5408622. PMID 28461794.
  2. 2.0 2.1 Adler Y, Charron P, Imazio M, Badano L, Barón-Esquivias G, Bogaert J; et al. (2015). "2015 ESC Guidelines for the diagnosis and management of pericardial diseases: The Task Force for the Diagnosis and Management of Pericardial Diseases of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC)Endorsed by: The European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery (EACTS)". Eur Heart J. 36 (42): 2921–2964. doi:10.1093/eurheartj/ehv318. PMID 26320112.

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