Constipation historical perspective

Jump to: navigation, search

Constipation Microchapters

Home

Patient Information

Overview

Historical Perspective

Classification

Pathophysiology

Causes

Differentiating Constipation from other Diseases

Epidemiology and Demographics

Risk Factors

Screening

Natural History, Complications and Prognosis

Diagnosis

Diagnostic Study of Choice

History and Symptoms

Physical Examination

Laboratory Findings

Abdominal X Ray

CT

MRI

Ultrasound

Other Imaging Findings

Other Diagnostic Studies

Treatment

Medical Therapy

Surgery

Primary Prevention

Secondary Prevention

Cost-Effectiveness of Therapy

Future or Investigational Therapies

Case Studies

Case #1

Constipation On the Web

Most recent articles

Most cited articles

Review articles

CME Programs

Powerpoint slides

Images

American Roentgen Ray Society Images of Constipation

All Images
X-rays
Ultrasound
CT Images
MRI

Ongoing Trials at Clinical Trials.gov

US National Guidelines Clearinghouse

NICE Guidance

FDA on Constipation

CDC on Constipation

Constipation in the news

Blogs on Constipation

Directions to Hospitals Treating Constipation

Risk calculators and risk factors for Constipation

Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Eiman Ghaffarpasand, M.D. [2]

Overview

The Egyptian Ebers papyrus, from 16th century BC is the first book that presented a basic description for constipation. Ebers papyrus defined constipation as intoxication of body with hazardous agents from feces in bowels. In early 1900s, all-bran products were first introduced to prevent and treat auto-intoxicated patients due to constipation. In 1970s and 1980s, Denis Burkitt, an English surgeon, claimed the hypothesis about dietary fibers followed by the definition of "The Commonest Western disease".

Historical Perspective

 
 
 
 
 
 
16th century BC
The Egyptian Ebers papyrus
First definition of constipation as intoxication of body toxins from feces in bowels
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
18th century
Personal physician of Louis XV in France
Defined constipation as blood pollution by toxins released from remaining wastes in the intestines
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Beginning of 19th century
Physicians
Believed constipation as a disease of civilization and urban population
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
1850s
An American health manual
Revealed that "daily emptying the bowels is of the utmost importance in being healthy"
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Disease perspective
 
 
1906
Charles Bouchard, a French physician
Proposed the "auto-intoxication theory"
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
1923
William Walsh, an American physician
Mentioned that not all the symptoms are related to poisons released from feces remaining in bowel
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
1924
Arbuthnot Lane, a British physician
Pointed out “the whiter your bread, the sooner you're dead
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
1928
Charles Campbell, an American physician
Postulated that wastes remaining in colon are decomposing and may make the body full of poisons
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
1928
Victor Paucher, a French internist
Suggested that stasis of feces in bowels creates "Sewer-like blood"
 
 
 


  • The Egyptian Ebers papyrus, from 16th century BC, is the first book that presented a basic description for constipation. Ebers papyrus defined constipation as intoxication of body with hazardous agents from feces in bowels.[1]
  • In 18th century, the personal physician of Louis XV in France, presented a similar definition as Ebers papyrus. He mentioned the constipation as blood pollution with released toxins from remained wastes in the intestines.[2]
  • In the beginning of 19th century, physicians believed that constipation was a disease of civilization and urban population was mostly involved with constipation.[3]
  • In 1850s, an American health manual revealed that "daily emptying the bowels is of the utmost importance in being healthy". Daily bowel movement was also suggested to prevent derangement and disturbance in body.[4]
  • In 1906, Charles Bouchard, a French physician proposed the "auto-intoxication theory", constipated person is continuously trying to commit suicide by auto-intoxication with toxins which are produced by feces remaining in his intestine.[5]
  • In 1923, William Walsh, an American physician, mentioned that not all the symptoms and severity of constipation are related to poisons released from feces remaining in bowels.[6]
  • In 1924, Arbuthnot Lane, a British physician, pointed out the relation between colon cancer and constipation. Lane presented that “the whiter your bread, the sooner you're dead”.[7]
  • In 1928, Charles Campbell, an American physician, postulated that wastes remaining in colon are decomposing and may make the body full of poisons.[8]
  • In 1928, Victor Paucher, a French internist, suggested that stasis of feces in bowels make poisons secreted into blood and creates "Sewer-like blood".[9]

Landmark Events in the Development of Treatment Strategies

 
 
 
 
1900
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
All-bran products were first introduced for the prevention and treatment of auto-intoxication due to constipation
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Early 1900s
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Yeasts introduced in the yogurt were also postulated to prevent the constipation and following auto-intoxication
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Arbuthnot Lane, a British physician, introduced Phenolphthalein as a strong laxative for children
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
1913
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Arbuthnot Lane also revealed that maintaining the normal human "drainage scheme" is the primary treatment for constipation
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
1981
 
Denis Burkitt an English surgeon, claimed the hypothesis about dietary fibers followed by the definition of "The Commonest Western disease"
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
2000
 
 


  • In early 1900s, all-bran products were first introduced for the prevention and treatment of auto-Intoxication due to constipation.[3]
  • In early 1900s, yeasts were also postulated to prevent the constipation and the auto-intoxication that follows, when introduced in the yogurt.[3]
  • In 1913, Phenolphthalein was introduced as a strong laxative for children. Phenolphthalein quickly became the best laxative.[7]
  • From 1900 to 1920, Arbuthnot Lane, a British physician, revealed that maintaining the normal human "drainage scheme" is the primary treatment for constipation.[7]
  • In 1970s and 1980s, Denis Burkitt an English surgeon, claimed the hypothesis about dietary fibers followed by the definition of "The Commonest Western disease".[10]

References

  1. Ebbell, B. (Bendix), 1865- (1937), The Papyrus Ebers : the greatest Egyptian medical document, Levin & Munksgaard, retrieved 14 November 2017
  2. Lieutaud, Joseph, 1703-1780; Atlee, Edwin Augustus, 1776-1852 (1816), Synopsis of the universal practice of medicine [electronic resource] : exhibiting a concise view of all diseases, both internal and external : illustrated with complete commentaries / by Joseph Lieutaud ; translated from the Latin by Edwin A. Atlee, Edward and Richard Parker
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 Whorton J (2000). "Civilisation and the colon: constipation as the "disease of diseases"". BMJ. 321 (7276): 1586–9. PMC 1119264. PMID 11124189.
  4. Root, Harmon Knox (1854), People's medical lighthouse; a series of popular and scientific essays., New York, Ranney
  5. Bouchard, Charles (1906), Lectures on Auto-Intoxication in Disease: Or, Self-Poisoning of the Individual, Philadelphia, F. A. Davis Company
  6. "The Conquest of Constipation". JAMA: The Journal of the American Medical Association. 81 (2): 158. 1923. doi:10.1001/jama.1923.02650020076035. ISSN 0098-7484.
  7. 7.0 7.1 7.2 Lane WA (1913). "An Address ON CHRONIC INTESTINAL STASIS: Delivered at the North-East London Post-Graduate College". Br Med J. 2 (2757): 1125–8. PMC 2346322. PMID 20766844.
  8. "The Lazy Colon. Newer Methods and Latest Advances of Science in the Treatment of Constipation". JAMA: The Journal of the American Medical Association. 90 (26): 2134. 1928. doi:10.1001/jama.1928.02690530062033. ISSN 0098-7484.
  9. Bilik, Samuel Ernest (1928), The trainers bible, New York city, Athletic trainers supply Co.
  10. Burkitt, D. P. (1981). Western diseases, their emergence and prevention. Cambridge, Mass: Harvard University Press. ISBN 978-0674950207.



Linked-in.jpg