Concussion physical examination

Jump to: navigation, search

Concussion Microchapters

Home

Patient Information

Overview

Definition

Historical Perspective

Classification

Pathophysiology

Causes

Differentiating Concussion from other Diseases

Epidemiology and Demographics

Risk Factors

Screening

Natural History, Complications and Prognosis

Diagnosis

Diagnostic Criteria

History and Symptoms

Physical Examination

CT

MRI

Other Imaging Findings

Other Diagnostic Studies

Treatment

Medical Therapy

Primary Prevention

Secondary Prevention

Cost-Effectiveness of Therapy

Future or Investigational Therapies

Case Studies

Case #1

Concussion physical examination On the Web

Most recent articles

Most cited articles

Review articles

CME Programs

Powerpoint slides

Images

American Roentgen Ray Society Images of Concussion physical examination

All Images
X-rays
Echo & Ultrasound
CT Images
MRI

Ongoing Trials at Clinical Trials.gov

US National Guidelines Clearinghouse

NICE Guidance

FDA on Concussion physical examination

CDC on Concussion physical examination

Concussion physical examination in the news

Blogs on Concussion physical examination

Directions to Hospitals Treating Concussion

Risk calculators and risk factors for Concussion physical examination

Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]

Please help WikiDoc by adding more content here. It's easy! Click here to learn about editing.

Overview

Diagnosis of MTBI is based on physical and neurological exams, duration of unconsciousness (usually less than 30 minutes) and post-traumatic amnesia (PTA; usually less than 24 hours), and the Glasgow Coma Scale (MTBI sufferers have scores of 13 to 15). Neuropsychological tests exist to measure cognitive function. The tests may be administered hours, days, or weeks after the injury, or at different times to determine whether there is a trend in the patient's condition.

Physical Examination

Unequal pupil size is a sign of a brain injury more serious than concussion.

Athletes may be tested before a sports season begins to provide a baseline comparison in the event of an injury.[1] Health care providers examine head trauma survivors to ensure that the injury is not a more severe medical emergency such as an intracranial hemorrhage. Indications that screening for more serious injury is needed include worsening of symptoms such as headache, persistent vomiting, increasing disorientation or a deteriorating level of consciousness, seizures, and unequal pupil size.


References

  1. Maroon JC, Lovell MR, Norwig J, Podell K, Powell JW, Hartl R (2000). "Cerebral concussion in athletes: evaluation and neuropsychological testing". Neurosurgery. 47 (3): 659–69, discussion 669-72. PMID 10981754.



Linked-in.jpg