CXCR6

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C-X-C chemokine receptor type 6 is a protein that in humans is encoded by the CXCR6 gene.[1][2][3] CXCR6 has also recently been designated CD186 (cluster of differentiation 186).

CXCR6 has been identified as an entry coreceptor used by HIV-1 and SIV to enter target cells, in conjunction with CD4.[1][2][3][4] It is a minor coreceptor for HIV-1, nearly all strains of which use CCR5 and/or CXCR4. Most SIV strains can use CXCR6 and recent evidence suggests that in monkeys that serve as the natural hosts of SIV, CXCR6 may be a major coreceptor.[4] CXCR6 was previously known as "Bonzo" and "STRL33" in the HIV/SIV field.

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Liao F, Alkhatib G, Peden KW, Sharma G, Berger EA, Farber JM (June 1997). "STRL33, A novel chemokine receptor-like protein, functions as a fusion cofactor for both macrophage-tropic and T cell line-tropic HIV-1". The Journal of Experimental Medicine. 185 (11): 2015–23. doi:10.1084/jem.185.11.2015. PMC 2196334. PMID 9166430.
  2. 2.0 2.1 Deng HK, Unutmaz D, KewalRamani VN, Littman DR (July 1997). "Expression cloning of new receptors used by simian and human immunodeficiency viruses". Nature. 388 (6639): 296–300. doi:10.1038/40894. PMID 9230441.
  3. 3.0 3.1 "Entrez Gene: CXCR6 chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 6".
  4. 4.0 4.1 Elliott ST, Wetzel KS, Francella N, Bryan S, Romero DC, Riddick NE, Shaheen F, Vanderford T, Derdeyn CA, Silvestri G, Paiardini M, Collman RG (September 2015). "Dualtropic CXCR6/CCR5 Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV) Infection of Sooty Mangabey Primary Lymphocytes: Distinct Coreceptor Use in Natural versus Pathogenic Hosts of SIV". Journal of Virology. 89 (18): 9252–61. doi:10.1128/JVI.01236-15. PMC 4542357. PMID 26109719.

Further reading

External links

This article incorporates text from the United States National Library of Medicine, which is in the public domain.




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