Aphthous ulcer epidemiology and demographics

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [4]

Epidemiology and Demographics

Prevalence

Aphthous ulcer is a very common oral lesion. The frequency of canker sores varies from fewer than 4 episodes per year (85% of all cases) to more than one episode per month (10% of all cases) including people suffering from continuous RAS.[1]

  • The prevalence of aphthous ulcer is estimated to range from 1,000 to 60,000 cases per 100,000 individuals annually among adult, and 1,000 to 60,000 cases per 100,000 individuals among children.
  • In Sweden, the prevalence of aphthous ulcer is range from 5,000 to 30,000 per 100,000 individuals.[2][1]
  • In the United States, the overall prevalence of recurrent aphthous ulcers was 1000 per 100,000 persons
  • In the United States, The prevalence of recurrent aphthous ulcer among children was estimated 1500 per 100,000 individuals, and the the prevalence among adults was estimated 850 per 100,000 individuals.[3][4][5][6]


Gender

Gender is associated with an increased risk of developing Aphthous ulcers. Women are more often affected by the disease than men.

Family

About 30–40% of patients with recurrent Aphthous ulcers report a family history of the disease. [7][8][9]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 T. Axéll, V. Henricsson (1985). "The occurrence of recurrent aphthous ulcers in an adult Swedish population". Acta Odontol Scand.
  2. J.M. Casiglia, G.W. Mirowski, C.L. Nebesio (2006). "Aphthous stomatitis". Emedecine. Unknown parameter |month= ignored (help)
  3. Kleinman DV, Swango PA, Pindborg JJ. Epidemiology of oral mucosal lesions in United States Schoolchildren: 1986–87. Community Dent Oral Epidemiol 1994; 22:243–53.
  4. Field EA, Allan RB. Oral ulceration—aetiopathogenesis, clinical diagnosis and management in the gastrointestinal clinic. Aliment Pharmacol Ther 2003;18: 949–62.
  5. Ferguson MM, Wray D, Carmichael HA, et al. Coeliac disease associated withrecurrent aphthae. Gut 1980;21:223–36.
  6. Soames JV, Southam JC. Oral pathology. 3rd edition. Oxford (UK): Oxford University Press; 1998.
  7. [1]
  8. [2]
  9. [3]

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