Aortic regurgitation electrocardiogram

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Cafer Zorkun, M.D., Ph.D. [2]; Varun Kumar, M.B.B.S.; Lakshmi Gopalakrishnan, M.B.B.S; Usama Talib, BSc, MD [3]

Overview

In aortic regurgitation, the electrocardiography findings are nonspecific. Electrocardiographic abnormalities in the patient with aortic regurgitation include left axis deviation and signs of left ventricular hypertrophy.[1]

Electrocardiogram

Electrocardiographic abnormalities in the patient with aortic regurgitation include:[1][2][3]

Shown below is an ECG depicting left ventricular hypertrophy. Copyleft image obtained courtesy of ECGpedia [4]

Left ventricular hypertrophy



Shown below is an ECG depicting left axis deviation. Copyleft image obtained courtesy of ECGpedia [5]

Left axis deviation


References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Bonow RO, Carabello B, de Leon AC, Edmunds LH, Fedderly BJ, Freed MD; et al. (1998). "ACC/AHA Guidelines for the Management of Patients With Valvular Heart Disease. Executive Summary. A report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines (Committee on Management of Patients With Valvular Heart Disease).". J Heart Valve Dis. 7 (6): 672–707. PMID 9870202. 
  2. Nishimura RA, Otto CM, Bonow RO, Carabello BA, Erwin JP, Guyton RA; et al. (2014). "2014 AHA/ACC guideline for the management of patients with valvular heart disease: a report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines.". J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 148 (1): e1–e132. PMID 24939033. doi:10.1016/j.jtcvs.2014.05.014. 
  3. Petit CJ, Gao K, Goldstein BH, Lang SM, Gillespie SE, Kim SI; et al. (2016). "Relation of Aortic Valve Morphologic Characteristics to Aortic Valve Insufficiency and Residual Stenosis in Children With Congenital Aortic Stenosis Undergoing Balloon Valvuloplasty.". Am J Cardiol. 117 (6): 972–9. PMID 26805657. doi:10.1016/j.amjcard.2015.12.034. 


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