Angiodysplasia other imaging findings

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]

Overview

Other Imaging Findings

Endoscopy

Diagnosis of angiodysplasia is often accomplished with endoscopy, either colonoscopy or esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD). lthough the lesions can be notoriously hard to find, the patient usually is diagnosed by endoscopy. A new technique, pill enteroscopy, has been a major advance in diagnosis, especially in the small bowel which is difficult to reach with traditional endoscopy. With this technique a pill that contains a video camera and radio transmitter is swallowed, and pictures of the small intestine are sent to a receiver worn by the patient.

Double Balloon Enteroscopy

Angiodysplasiae in the small bowel can also be diagnosed and treated with double-balloon enteroscopy, a technique involving a long endoscopic camera and overtube, both fitted with balloons, that allow the bowel to be accordioned over the camera.[1]

References

  1. Neumann H, Mönkemüller K, Malfertheiner P (2007). "Obscure overt GI bleeding secondary to angiodysplasias at the hepaticojejunostomy diagnosed and successfully treated with double-balloon enteroscopy". Gastrointest Endosc: 563. PMID 17981272. doi:10.1016/j.gie.2007.06.051. 



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