Alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency secondary prevention

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Mazia Fatima, MBBS [2]

Overview

Secondary prevention strategies following alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) includes advising the patient to avoid cigarette smoking. Smoking accelerates the progression of emphysema in severely deficient individuals by as much as 15 years when compared to their nonsmoking controls. Pneumonia and annual influenza vaccines will help prevent respiratory infections in patients with alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD).The ATS/ERS AAT Deficiency Task Force recommends that all exacerbations with purulent sputum be treated with early antibiotic therapy. Prompt and effective treatment of infections may provide protection from additional lung injury from an influx of neutrophils into the alveolus.

Secondary Prevention

Secondary prevention strategies following alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) includes :[1][2]

References

  1. Fregonese L, Stolk J (2008). "Hereditary alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency and its clinical consequences". Orphanet J Rare Dis. 3: 16. doi:10.1186/1750-1172-3-16. PMC 2441617. PMID 18565211.
  2. Abusriwil H, Stockley RA (2006). "Alpha-1-antitrypsin replacement therapy: current status". Curr Opin Pulm Med. 12 (2): 125–31. doi:10.1097/01.mcp.0000208452.57854.c6. PMID 16456382.



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