Allergy laboratory findings

Jump to: navigation, search

Allergy Microchapters

Home

Patient Information

Overview

Historical Perspective

Pathophysiology

Causes

Differentiating Allergies from other Diseases

Epidemiology and Demographics

Risk Factors

Screening

Natural History, Complications and Prognosis

Diagnosis

History and Symptoms

Physical Examination

Laboratory Findings

Other Diagnostic Studies

Treatment

Medical Therapy

Primary Prevention

Secondary Prevention

Cost-Effectiveness of Therapy

Future or Investigational Therapies

Case Studies

Case #1

Allergy laboratory findings On the Web

Most recent articles

Most cited articles

Review articles

CME Programs

Powerpoint slides

Images

American Roentgen Ray Society Images of Allergy laboratory findings

All Images
X-rays
Echo & Ultrasound
CT Images
MRI

Ongoing Trials at Clinical Trials.gov

US National Guidelines Clearinghouse

NICE Guidance

FDA on Allergy laboratory findings

CDC on Allergy laboratory findings

Allergy laboratory findings in the news

Blogs on Allergy laboratory findings

Directions to Hospitals Treating Allergies

Risk calculators and risk factors for Allergy laboratory findings

Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]

Laboratory Findings

Allergy testing may be needed to determine if the symptoms are an actual allergy or caused by other problems. For example, eating contaminated food (food poisoning) may cause symptoms similar to food allergies. Some medications (such as aspirin and ampicillin) can produce non-allergic reactions, including rashes. A runny nose or cough may actually be due to an infection.

Skin testing is the most common method of allergy testing. One type of skin testing is the prick test. It involves placing a small amount of the suspected allergy-causing substances on the skin, and then slightly pricking the area so the substance moves under the skin. The skin is closely watched for signs of a reaction, which include swelling and redness. Skin testing may be an option for some young children and infants. Other types of skin tests include patch testing and intradermal testing.

Blood tests can measure the levels of specific allergy-related substances, especially one called immunoglobulin E (IgE). A complete blood count (CBC), specifically the eosinophil white blood cell count, may also help reveal allergies.

In some cases, avoiding certain items to see if one gets better, or using suspected items to see if one feels worse is often used to check for food or medication allergies. This is called "use or elimination testing."

Reaction to physical triggers like applying heat, cold, or other stimulation to body and watching for an allergic response is also tested.

Sometimes, a suspected allergen is dissolved and dropped into the lower eyelid to check for an allergic reaction

References



Linked-in.jpg