Alcoholic cardiomyopathy echocardiography

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Alcoholic cardiomyopathy Microchapters

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Differentiating Alcoholic cardiomyopathy from other Diseases

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Raviteja Guddeti, M.B.B.S. [2]; Hardik Patel, M.D.

Overview

Echocardiography is the most useful initial diagnostic test in the evaluation of patients with heart failure. Because of its noninvasive nature and the ease of the test, it is the test of choice in the initial and follow-up evaluation of most forms of cardiomyopathy. It provides information not only on overall heart size and function, but also on valvular structure and function, wall motion and thickness, and pericardial disease.

Echocardiography

Possible echocardiographic findings include: [1][2]

References

  1. Piano MR (2002). "Alcoholic cardiomyopathy: incidence, clinical characteristics, and pathophysiology". Chest. 121 (5): 1638–50. PMID 12006456. 
  2. Orlando E, Gennari P, Boari C (1980). "[Echocardiographic study of the left ventricle in chronic alcoholism]". Minerva Medica (in Italian). 71 (44): 3235–9. PMID 6450342. 
  3. Lazarević AM, Nakatani S, Nesković AN; et al. (2000). "Early changes in left ventricular function in chronic asymptomatic alcoholics: relation to the duration of heavy drinking". Journal of the American College of Cardiology. 35 (6): 1599–606. PMID 10807466. 
  4. Askanas A, Udoshi M, Sadjadi SA (1980). "The heart in chronic alcoholism: a noninvasive study". American Heart Journal. 99 (1): 9–16. PMID 6444262. 
  5. Fernández-Solà J, Nicolás JM, Paré JC; et al. (2000). "Diastolic function impairment in alcoholics". Alcoholism, Clinical and Experimental Research. 24 (12): 1830–5. PMID 11141042. 
  6. Estruch R, Fernández-Solá J, Sacanella E, Paré C, Rubin E, Urbano-Márquez A (1995). "Relationship between cardiomyopathy and liver disease in chronic alcoholism". Hepatology (Baltimore, Md.). 22 (2): 532–8. PMID 7635421. 
  7. Kelbaek H, Eriksen J, Brynjolf I; et al. (1984). "Cardiac performance in patients with asymptomatic alcoholic cirrhosis of the liver". The American Journal of Cardiology. 54 (7): 852–5. PMID 6486037. 
  8. Dancy M, Bland JM, Leech G, Gaitonde MK, Maxwell JD (1985). "Preclinical left ventricular abnormalities in alcoholics are independent of nutritional status, cirrhosis, and cigarette smoking". Lancet. 1 (8438): 1122–5. PMID 2860335. 


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