Adult-onset Still's disease historical perspective

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Adult-onset Still's disease

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Syed Hassan A. Kazmi BSc, MD [2]

Overview

Adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) is an inflammatory condition characterized by high spiking fever, rash, sore throat, and joint pain. In 1896, an English doctor named George Frederick Still, described the condition in children and the disease is named after him. In 1971, EG Bywaters described the term "adult Still's disease" which was later used for adults who had a condition similar to systemic onset JRA. There's no cure for adult-onset Still's disease; however, symptomatic treatment using corticosteroids, anti-interleukin agents and disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) may provide relief, and aid in remission.

Historical Perspective

  • Adult-onset Still's disease is an inflammatory condition characterized by high spiking fever, rash, sore throat, and joint pain.[1]
  • As it progresses, adult-onset Still's disease may lead to chronic arthritis and other complications.
  • In 1896, an English doctor named George Frederick Still, described the condition in children and the disease is named after him.[2]
  • Still's disease occurring in children < 16 years is now referred to as systemic onset juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA).
  • In 1971, EG Bywaters described the term "adult Still's disease" which was later used for adults who had a condition similar to systemic onset JRA.[3]
  • The cause of adult-onset Still's disease is unknown. Risk factors known to be associated with Still's disease are stress and infections (pathogen-associated molecular patterns- PAMPs)
  • There's no cure for adult-onset Still's disease; however, symptomatic treatment using corticosteroids, anti-interleukin agents and disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) may provide relief, and aid in remission.

References

  1. "Adult Still disease: MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia".
  2. "What is Still's Disease? | Still's Disease Information Center".
  3. Bywaters EG (March 1971). "Still's disease in the adult". Ann. Rheum. Dis. 30 (2): 121–33. PMC 1005739. PMID 5315135.



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