Acute cholecystitis epidemiology and demographics

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Furqan M M. M.B.B.S[2]

Overview

The incidence of acute cholecystitis is approximately 6,300 per 100,000 in individuals under 50 years age and 20,900 per 100,000 in individuals over 50 years age worldwide. The prevalence of acute cholecystitis is approximately 369 per 100,000 individuals in the United States. It is estimated from the population-based statistics, based on a comprehensive survey in the U.S. Acute cholecystitis is comparatively less prevalent in the developing countries. The mortality rate of acute cholecystitis is approximately 0.6%. Acute cholecystitis usually affects individuals of the North American Indian race. Females are more commonly affected by acute cholecystitis than males. Acute cholecystitis cases are reported worldwide. Acute cholecystitis accounts for 700,000 cholecystectomies and costs of ∼$6.5 billion annually only in the United States.

Epidemiology and Demographics

Incidence

  • The incidence of acute cholecystitis is approximately 6,300 per 100,000 in individuals under 50 years age and 20,900 per 100,000 in individuals over 50 years age worldwide.[1][2]

Prevalence

  • The prevalence of acute cholecystitis is approximately 369 per 100,000 individuals in the United states. It is estimated from the population-based statistics, based on a comprehensive survey in the U.S.[3]

Case-fatality rate/Mortality rate

Age

  • The incidence of acute cholecystitis increases with age.[2][3][4]

Race

  • Gallstone diseases usually affects individuals of the North American Indian race. White Americans, Asians, African Americans, and Africans are less likely to develop acute cholecystitis.[3][4]

Gender

  • Females are more commonly affected by gallstone diseases than males. The female to male ratio ranges from 10:1 in Pima Indians to 2–3:1 in Europeans women.[3][4]

Region

  • Acute cholecystitis cases are reported worldwide. America and Europe have high rates of gallbladder stones as compared to Asia and Africa.[3]

Developed Countries

  • Gallstone disease accounts for 700,000 cholecystectomies and costs of ∼$6.5 billion annually only in the United States.[3]
    • Gallstone disease is prevalent in North America with a racial predisposition to the American Indians.
    • South American countries have slightly more prevalence than North America.
    • In Europe, Scandinavian countries have the highest prevalence of acute cholecystitis.
    • Italy, Austria, England, Germany, and Poland have a higher prevalence among the rest of Europe.

Developing Countries

  • Gallstone diseases are comparatively less prevalent in the developing countries.[3]
    • India and Taiwan have a higher prevalence of acute cholecystitis in the developing countries.

References

  1. Kimura Y, Takada T, Kawarada Y, Nimura Y, Hirata K, Sekimoto M, Yoshida M, Mayumi T, Wada K, Miura F, Yasuda H, Yamashita Y, Nagino M, Hirota M, Tanaka A, Tsuyuguchi T, Strasberg SM, Gadacz TR (2007). "Definitions, pathophysiology, and epidemiology of acute cholangitis and cholecystitis: Tokyo Guidelines". J Hepatobiliary Pancreat Surg. 14 (1): 15–26. PMC 2784509Freely accessible. PMID 17252293. doi:10.1007/s00534-006-1152-y. 
  2. 2.0 2.1 Telfer S, Fenyö G, Holt PR, de Dombal FT (1988). "Acute abdominal pain in patients over 50 years of age". Scand. J. Gastroenterol. Suppl. 144: 47–50. PMID 3165555. 
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 3.6 3.7 Shaffer EA (2006). "Gallstone disease: Epidemiology of gallbladder stone disease". Best Pract Res Clin Gastroenterol. 20 (6): 981–96. PMID 17127183. doi:10.1016/j.bpg.2006.05.004. 
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 Knab LM, Boller AM, Mahvi DM (2014). "Cholecystitis". Surg. Clin. North Am. 94 (2): 455–70. PMID 24679431. doi:10.1016/j.suc.2014.01.005. 

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