Acoustic neuroma history and symptoms

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Simrat Sarai, M.D. [2]

Overview

Symptoms of acoustic neuroma include hearing loss, tinnitus, vertigo, headaches, facial weakness, facial numbness and tingling, dizziness, taste changes, difficulty swallowing and hoarseness and, confusion.[1][2]

Symptoms

Symptoms and signs of Acoustic neuroma considerably dependent on the size of tumor, for instance, generalized headache occurs in less than 20% of patients with small acoustic tumors (less than 2cm), although it can occur in 43 to 75% of patients with tumor over 4cm in diameter.[3] In table 1 and table 2 there are information about the frequency of major symptoms and signs and cranial nerve disturbances respectively. [4]

Table 1
Major signs and symptoms Diagnostic accuracy of clinical features in predicting the tumor progress
Signs and symptoms Frequency Sensitivity Specificity
Hypacusis The most common High low
Facial paresthesia Commonly seen Moderate Moderate
Instability of gait
Tinnitus
Hearing loss Occasionally seen low high
Headache
Facial paralysis
Vertigo
Absent corneal reflex
Bucking Rarely seen Very low Very high
Visual disorder
Nausea and vomiting
Nystagmus
Movement disorder
Mastication disorder
Romberg sign
Hoarseness
Abduction disorder
Ear pain

Cranial nerve

Cranial nerve disturbances was related to the Cochlear nerve and Trigeminal nerve. The Facial nerve disturbances occurs in more sever cases.

Table 2
Nerve Symptop\sign Frequency
V Trigeminal nerve disturbance Commonly seen
VI Abduction disorder rarely seen
VII Facial nerve disturbance Occasionally seen
VIII Hearing deficits Mostly seen
VIII Vestibular disturbance Occasionally seen
IX-XII Caudal cranial nerve deficits Seldom seen

References

  1. Vestibular Schwannoma. Wikipedia(2015) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vestibular_schwannoma Accessed on October 2 2015
  2. [https ://medlineplus.gov/acousticneuroma.html "MedlinePlus Acoustic neuroma"]. 
  3. Robert G. Hart, M.D. and John Davenport, M.D (1981). "Diagnosis of Acoustic Neuroma". Neurosurgery. 4: 450. 
  4. XIANG HUANG, JIAN XU, MING XU, LIANG-FU ZHOU, RONG ZHANG, LIQIN LANG, QIWU XU, PING ZHONG, MINGYU CHEN, YING WANG and ZHENYU ZHANG (2012). "Clinical features of intracranial vestibular schwannomas". ONCOLOGY LETTERS. 

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