Acinic cell carcinoma surgery

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Overview

Surgical resection is mainstay of treatment for acinic cell carcinoma.

Surgery

Surgery is usually the main form of treatment for resectable salivary gland cancers.Large bulky tumors or high-grade tumors carry a poorer prognosis and may best be treated by surgical resection combined with postoperative radiation therapy.[1]

Follow-up after treatment

Complications of surgical treatment for parotid neoplasms include facial nerve dysfunction and frey syndrome, also known as gustatory flushing or auriculotemporal syndrome.[2]Frey syndrome has been successfully treated with injections of botulinum toxin A.[3],[4]

References

  1. Parsons JT, Mendenhall WM, Stringer SP, Cassisi NJ, Million RR (1996). "Management of minor salivary gland carcinomas.". Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 35 (3): 443–54. PMID 8655366. 
  2. Gooden E, Witterick IJ, Hacker D, Rosen IB, Freeman JL (2002). "Parotid gland tumours in 255 consecutive patients: Mount Sinai Hospital's quality assurance review.". J Otolaryngol. 31 (6): 351–4. PMID 12593546. 
  3. Naumann M, Zellner M, Toyka KV, Reiners K (1997). "Treatment of gustatory sweating with botulinum toxin.". Ann Neurol. 42 (6): 973–5. PMID 9403490. doi:10.1002/ana.410420619. 
  4. von Lindern JJ, Niederhagen B, Bergé S, Hägler G, Reich RH (2000). "Frey syndrome: treatment with type A botulinum toxin.". Cancer. 89 (8): 1659–63. PMID 11042557. 

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