Abdominal aortic aneurysm history and symptoms

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor-In-Chief: Cafer Zorkun, M.D., Ph.D. [2]; Hardik Patel, M.D.

Overview

Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) are usually asymptomatic until they expand or rupture. Spontaneous abdominal pain in a patient with a pulsatile epigastric mass or a known AAA may signal a rupture into the retroperitoneum or leakage within the aneurysm wall. If a patient does develop symptoms, the risk of rupture is quite high, which is why symptoms are considered an indication for surgery. Pain is the most common symptomatic manifestation.

History

Given that smoking increases the risk of developing an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), a smoking history should be obtained in elderly men. If a male over the age of 65 has a history of smoking, he should undergo ultrasonography to screen for an AAA.

Symptoms

Abdominal aortic aneurysms are usually asymptomatic until they expand or rupture. The following symptoms may be present:

Associated Symptoms

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Chaikof, EL.; Brewster, DC.; Dalman, RL.; Makaroun, MS.; Illig, KA.; Sicard, GA.; Timaran, CH.; Upchurch, GR.; Veith, FJ. (2009). "The care of patients with an abdominal aortic aneurysm: the Society for Vascular Surgery practice guidelines.". J Vasc Surg. 50 (4 Suppl): S2–49. PMID 19786250. doi:10.1016/j.jvs.2009.07.002.  Unknown parameter |month= ignored (help)
  2. Ferri, Fred (2015). Ferri's clinical advisor 2015 : 5 books in 1. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier/Mosby. ISBN 978-0323083751. 
  3. Ferri, Fred (2015). Ferri's clinical advisor 2015 : 5 books in 1. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier/Mosby. ISBN 978-0323083751. 


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