ATP1B3

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External IDsGeneCards: [1]
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SpeciesHumanMouse
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Sodium/potassium-transporting ATPase subunit beta-3 is an enzyme that in humans is encoded by the ATP1B3 gene.[1][2][3] ATP1B3 has also been designated as CD298 (cluster of differentiation 298).

The protein encoded by this gene belongs to the family of Na+/K+ and H+/K+ ATPases beta chain proteins, and to the subfamily of Na+/K+ -ATPases. Na+/K+ -ATPase is an integral membrane protein responsible for establishing and maintaining the electrochemical gradients of Na and K ions across the plasma membrane. These gradients are essential for osmoregulation, for sodium-coupled transport of a variety of organic and inorganic molecules, and for electrical excitability of nerve and muscle. This enzyme is composed of two subunits, a large catalytic subunit (alpha) and a smaller glycoprotein subunit (beta). The beta subunit regulates, through assembly of alpha/beta heterodimers, the number of sodium pumps transported to the plasma membrane. The glycoprotein subunit of Na+/K+ -ATPase is encoded by multiple genes. This gene encodes a beta 3 subunit. A pseudogene exists for this gene, and it is located on chromosome 2.[3]

References

  1. Malik N, Canfield VA, Beckers MC, Gros P, Levenson R (Nov 1996). "Identification of the mammalian Na,K-ATPase 3 subunit". J Biol Chem. 271 (37): 22754–8. doi:10.1074/jbc.271.37.22754. PMID 8798450.
  2. Malik N, Canfield V, Sanchez-Watts G, Watts AG, Scherer S, Beatty BG, Gros P, Levenson R (Mar 1998). "Structural organization and chromosomal localization of the human Na,K-ATPase beta 3 subunit gene and pseudogene". Mamm Genome. 9 (2): 136–43. doi:10.1007/s003359900704. PMID 9457675.
  3. 3.0 3.1 "Entrez Gene: ATP1B3 ATPase, Na+/K+ transporting, beta 3 polypeptide".

Further reading

External links

This article incorporates text from the United States National Library of Medicine, which is in the public domain.



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