21-hydroxylase deficiency physical examination

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Mehrian Jafarizade, M.D [2]

Overview

Patients with 21-hydroxylase deficiency usually appear underweight and dehydrated. Physical examination is usually remarkable for hypotension and virilization.

Physical Examination

Common physical examination findings of 21-hydroxylase deficiency include:[1][2][3][4][5]

General appearance of the patient

Vitals

Head

Skin

Genitals

By Patou Tantbirojn, Mana Taweevisit, Suchila Sritippayawan, Boonchai Uerpairojkit. - Diabetic fetopathy associated with bilateral adrenal hyperplasia and ambiguous genitalia: a case report. Journal of Medical Case Reports. 2008; 2 : 251. doi:10.1186/1752-1947-2-251, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=4980396


Cognitive function:

References

  1. White PC, Speiser PW (2000). "Congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency". Endocr. Rev. 21 (3): 245–91. PMID 10857554. doi:10.1210/edrv.21.3.0398. 
  2. van der Kamp HJ, Wit JM (2004). "Neonatal screening for congenital adrenal hyperplasia". Eur. J. Endocrinol. 151 Suppl 3: U71–5. PMID 15554889. 
  3. Eugster EA, Dimeglio LA, Wright JC, Freidenberg GR, Seshadri R, Pescovitz OH (2001). "Height outcome in congenital adrenal hyperplasia caused by 21-hydroxylase deficiency: a meta-analysis.". J Pediatr. 138 (1): 26–32. PMID 11148508. doi:10.1067/mpd.2001.110527. 
  4. Zucker KJ, Bradley SJ, Oliver G, Blake J, Fleming S, Hood J (1996). "Psychosexual development of women with congenital adrenal hyperplasia". Horm Behav. 30 (4): 300–18. PMID 9047259. doi:10.1006/hbeh.1996.0038. 
  5. Stikkelbroeck NM, Suliman HM, Otten BJ, Hermus AR, Blickman JG, Jager GJ (2003). "Testicular adrenal rest tumours in postpubertal males with congenital adrenal hyperplasia: sonographic and MR features.". Eur Radiol. 13 (7): 1597–603. PMID 12835972. doi:10.1007/s00330-002-1786-3. 

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